Lee Tung Street, the renowned “Wedding Card Street” is a war zone in the middle of Wanchai’s massive re-generation. Over the last 6 months, Community Museum Project, employing special photographic technique and digital technology, has constructed a complete view of the façade of the buildings as well as the spectrum of shops and residences, in an attempt to understand the ecology of a street. This is the same familiar street, but from an angle you do not see every day.

Street as Museum: Lee Tung Street is the inaugural project of A-Link gallery and a publication launched by Community Museum. (To place an order for the publication, please download the Order Form.)

2005 A-LINK at C.C. Wu Building



Sample pages from publication - Click for Larger picture


Exhibition in A-Link

 


What catch our eyes in Lee Tung Street today are the tape-sealed windows, the “This is an Urban Renewal Authority property” signage and the yellow protest banners that claim “Give me back my printing street”. Lee Tung Street is a war zone in the middle of Wanchai’s massive re-generation. On any day since the plan of re-development was announced, one can find endless crowd taking photos of the “printing street” or “wedding card street” before it vanishes.

In an attempt at “cultural preservation”, Community Museum Project conducted an unusual visual documentation of this renowned street. Over the last 6 months, Community Museum Project, employing special photographic technique and digital technology, has constructed a complete view of the façade of the buildings. This is the same familiar street, but from an unusual view. We hope this is a complement to the usual text-based oral history and documentary photography approaches. What is presented here is not merely nostalgia, but is an often-neglected visual knowledge of a site. From here, we may be able to understand the ecology of a street.

Street as Museum: Lee Tung Street is a publication launched by Community Museum Project. It is also the inaugural project of A-Link at C C Wu Building, We invited the residents and shop-owners to chat with the visitors about the lives at the renowned “Wedding Card Street” with the help of the panorama street view as the pilot. Tak Kee, a print shop on the street for 30 plus years, also brought along their printing machine and station in the venue. Old-style typecast printing was demonstrated on site. Visitors also had the hands-on opportunity.